Accessing network share


kaprikawn

Very Active Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2008
Messages
392
Location
UK
Website
kaprikawn.wordpress.com
Hi,

I've got a Linux PC at home that is basically just used as a file server using Samba. Given that I don't usually need mobile gaming and most of my Pandora use will be within wifi range would I be right in thinking that it'll be relatively easy to access my files using the Pandora? Mainly I'll just want to stream my music (a mix of flac and mp3s) and, if possible, access the roms that I've already got on the network share. There's no reason why I can't do this, right? Or do the roms and music have to be stored locally (i.e. on an SD card or other storage directly connected) for the Pandora to play them?
 

joseluisjazz

Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Messages
399
kaprikawn said:
Mainly I'll just want to stream my music (a mix of flac and mp3s) and, if possible, access the roms that I've already got on the network share. There's no reason why I can't do this, right? Or do the roms and music have to be stored locally (i.e. on an SD card or other storage directly connected) for the Pandora to play them?
IMHO that will be perfectly possible. that was my plan too, for use with a Linux server. Even more, I intend to install samba, to be able to mount network shared Windows drives & printers, and rdesktop for remotely login to a Windows server.
 

salasq

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2008
Messages
106
stupot said:
Is it possible in any wayto set up a share with a mac? ta
Easily, smb would be easiest tho your mac will scream about security issues, nfs takes some minor tweaking, or go crazy and set your Pandy up with afp & bonjour.

Macs are normal computers, y'know;)
 

stupot

Still Fresh
Joined
Oct 5, 2008
Messages
54
salasq said:
stupot said:
Is it possible in any wayto set up a share with a mac? ta
Easily, smb would be easiest tho your mac will scream about security issues, nfs takes some minor tweaking, or go crazy and set your Pandy up with afp & bonjour.

Macs are normal computers, y'know;)
No they arent! they are much better ;)

I guess my question should of been what will be the best/easiest way :)
 

salasq

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2008
Messages
106
stupot said:
I guess my question should of been what will be the best/easiest way :)
'Best' would be nfs, but easiest is definitely smb. System prefs -> Sharing -> check File Sharing, click options, check smb. Then just samba in from any Win/Lin machine.

Macs, definitely, prod buttock.
 

javaJake

Jacob Godserv
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
1,772
Location
USA
Website
myhumblecorner.wordpress.com
Actually, the best way, believe it or not, is sshfs, since it requires user login, encrypts everything that is transferred, and supports all the file-system features (permissions, symlinks, etc).

There really is no easy way when it comes to Linux, though. Sharing files on a network has always been a pain, in my experience.
 

truekaiser

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2008
Messages
130
javaJake said:
Actually, the best way, believe it or not, is sshfs, since it requires user login, encrypts everything that is transferred, and supports all the file-system features (permissions, symlinks, etc).

There really is no easy way when it comes to Linux, though. Sharing files on a network has always been a pain, in my experience.

three steps.

1. enable nfs in your kernel for both machines.

2. edit /etc/exports on both machines to list the directory's you want shared.

3. edit /etc/fstab and add lines for the opposite machine share so you can mount and transfer files.

though most distro's have nfs already enabled and when you configure it via either kde or gnome it edits the other two files automatically.

why this is simple? because unlike samba your not using the old corporate network system just to share files between computers. Samba used to be the window's network infrastructure protocol and system before nt, aka windows 3.11 days. when you set up two window's computers or a windows and a linux computer to do samba, the thing that causes the most trouble is that the system needs a samba server for it to work, window's hides this from you because Microsoft thinks it's too complicated for the average user to understand. The end result is that it will always default to auto negotiation. Because of that a good amount of the time neither computer can agree on the other being the 'server' end result is that you can't 'see' the other computer in 'my network'.
 

stupot

Still Fresh
Joined
Oct 5, 2008
Messages
54
Truekaiser said:
javaJake said:
Actually, the best way, believe it or not, is sshfs, since it requires user login, encrypts everything that is transferred, and supports all the file-system features (permissions, symlinks, etc).

There really is no easy way when it comes to Linux, though. Sharing files on a network has always been a pain, in my experience.

three steps.

1. enable nfs in your kernel for both machines.

2. edit /etc/exports on both machines to list the directory's you want shared.

3. edit /etc/fstab and add lines for the opposite machine share so you can mount and transfer files.

though most distro's have nfs already enabled and when you configure it via either kde or gnome it edits the other two files automatically.

why this is simple? because unlike samba your not using the old corporate network system just to share files between computers. Samba used to be the window's network infrastructure protocol and system before nt, aka windows 3.11 days. when you set up two window's computers or a windows and a linux computer to do samba, the thing that causes the most trouble is that the system needs a samba server for it to work, window's hides this from you because Microsoft thinks it's too complicated for the average user to understand. The end result is that it will always default to auto negotiation. Because of that a good amount of the time neither computer can agree on the other being the 'server' end result is that you can't 'see' the other computer in 'my network'.
Thanks that looks useful do you have any links that go into a bit more detail?

e.g number 1 how to actually do that on a mac?
 

skeezix

Internal Development
Joined
Mar 11, 2003
Messages
8,064
Website
www.codejedi.com
Obviously, you should be using the pandora as the network share server, passing out smb and nfs volumes. Think of the karma!

jeff
 

Chip

[Insert Custom Title Here]
Joined
Jun 25, 2003
Messages
3,503
Age
41
Location
NJ, USA
Website
chipandre.com
pferguso said:
is the Pandora going to be this much a pain in the ass to get connected to the internet through a wireless router that is connected to a x86 Windows XP machine?
Your question is confusing. Do you really mean "Connected to the internet"? If so, then anything else connected to the router is irrelevant.

If you're asking about network shares between the Pandora and a Windows computer, the answer is still "no". Windows file sharing = SMB = SAMBA = will probably work out of the box with little (if any) configuration.
 

truekaiser

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2008
Messages
130
stupot said:
Thanks that looks useful do you have any links that go into a bit more detail?

e.g number 1 how to actually do that on a mac?

apple should have compiled in the kernel by default, you just need to go the configuration control panel or what ever it's called on a mac and turn on nfs under network shares. for linux one can use either their distro specific documentation or use gentoo's which should work on all of them if one does not mind using the command line.

gentoo's nfs guide.
http://gentoo-wiki.com/HOWTO_Share_Directories_via_NFS
(link is down at the moment of this post but should come back up.)
 
Top