1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Dismiss Notice

Children's Books - A non-exhaustive listing of some good ones

Discussion in 'Offtopic Discussions' started by ible, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. ible

    ible Advanced Guard Tower

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2014
    Messages:
    1,655
    Location:
    Twice in North Dakota, once in the Netherlands
    As a parent, you become a bit of a connoisseur of these things, and can appreciate the subtle nuance.

    Hoot Owl, Master of Disguise -- an owl needs to eat, and he's pretty ferocious:
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22292490-hoot-owl-master-of-disguise

    Two books out of the Hat Trilogy, excellent dark humor, by Jon Klassen
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11233988-i-want-my-hat-back
    this next one has even some heart, which was pretty interesting given the dark humor background...
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28473874-we-found-a-hat

    TT Khing's many-intertwined-stories in a single book without any text/dialogue:
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1921315.Where_is_the_Cake_

    Bear Song, a little bear gets "lost" in the big city, and his dad has to find him:
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17352907-the-bear-s-song

    Catawampus Cat: A cat walks into town with a tilt, and everyone starts finding new things after tilting their heads, too:
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30900260-the-catawampus-cat

    will try to add to the thread as we get more fun ones from the library.
     
    Tenka likes this.
  2. ZXDunny

    ZXDunny Deep avatar

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2010
    Messages:
    2,364
    Anything by Julia Donaldson. Literally anything. You could slice her open at any angle and find gold.
    Eric Carle does some amazingly charming stuff for little ones.

    We head down to the library every saturday and get some books out for the small one. It's a wonderful place.
     
    ible likes this.
  3. rygD

    rygD Nihilistic Mystic

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Messages:
    6,383
    Location:
    Everywhere
    A decent encyclopedia set, a variety of science and history books, and more along these lines. Probably need to throw in a subscription to National Geographic and Smithsonian magazines, or comparable in the country of residence (or stop by the library and read 'em). I was/am fond of Discover and a handful of other science magazines.

    For fiction, have some horror and science fiction that has stood up well to time. Dracula and Frankenstein are pretty obvious, plus Jules Verne, H.G. Wells and Poe. I like to recommend Lovecraft, and the controversy around him can probably allow other topics to be discussed. Grimms' Fairy Tales, of course, although you might want to do some research to figure out which versions you feel are most appropriate. Oh, and Lewis Carroll. You might want to have the likes of Tolkien around, although that might be a bit much to throw at some kiddos (I got bored quickly). Also check out local folklore and history, and you can include visits as a part of the experience. They will like what they like, but they might find some in that group that they love. I also think Classical Mythology should be introduced early on, although they may get that in school eventually (however I feel that it is often handled poorly, probably because of Bullfinch).

    Once they hit 10 or so you might need to expand to age appropriate stuff.

    My most important suggestion is probably to encourage reading about things that interest the child. For me some things I was interested were kinda taboo (but my maternal grandmother shared related interests, so it worked out for me). I think parental guidance is a better option than them needing to hide it and turn to untrustworthy sources of info, which is probably a bigger problem now than when I was a little one due to internet access everywhere. It is probably also a good idea to point then toward things they may not have an intruder in just so they know about it (in my experience, most of the time this goes in one ear and out the other, although sometimes they hold on to something).

    Of course whatever is new and popular at the time might at least keep them reading. Goosebumps, anyone? Maybe some Harry Potter?
     
  4. ible

    ible Advanced Guard Tower

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2014
    Messages:
    1,655
    Location:
    Twice in North Dakota, once in the Netherlands
    sure, at the moment i'm the direct filter, since i'm doing the reading of the books (or my spouse). i loved animorphs growing up, until it just became more of the same all the time. goosebumps i still recall some of the weird stories. but yes, we'll get to those at another time...

    i'll check out julia donaldson the next time i make it to the library. and yes, carle is very classic. i very much like his "Slowly slowly slowly" book about sloths, which encourages you to take time about things...
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/388307._Slowly_Slowly_Slowly_said_the_Sloth
     
  5. rygD

    rygD Nihilistic Mystic

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Messages:
    6,383
    Location:
    Everywhere
    Some of the Goosebumps stories weren't so great, even to me back then, but I still read them for a while. I think the one with the mask might still be pretty good. It is one of my favorites. (Not sure the age, but this would be the time of year for those, unless they are a year round thing...my grandmother got me into horror and thrillers early on.)

    Again, depending on the age, The Hungry Little Caterpillar, or something like that, seems to be pretty popular. It was probably after my time, so I never really appreciated it. Dr. Seuss is fun for young and old.
     
  6. erico

    erico Advanced Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,544
    Location:
    Brasil
    Depending on how old you are looking at, The Little Vampire saga from Angela Sommer-Bodenburg is quite nice.
    If you would like a more Brazilian original asset, Lúcia já vou indo from Maria Heloisa and Penteado, is awesome stuff (I´m afraid it only has portuguese, but it is very visual).
     
  7. ZXDunny

    ZXDunny Deep avatar

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2010
    Messages:
    2,364
    Oh yes, we have a load of Dr. Seuss here - the small one (5 years old) absolutely loves those. Oh, also the Thomas the Tank Engine by Rev. Awdry are firm favourites and have been for a couple of years.
     
    rygD likes this.
  8. rygD

    rygD Nihilistic Mystic

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Messages:
    6,383
    Location:
    Everywhere
    Thomas the Tank Engine is also a bit after my time (I didn't know it was a book or books). At least by way of the television show it is popular, and probably a good match for a lot of the younger ones.

    On the topic of television shows, Reading Rainbow was a great show. My favorite episode was the one that desired him on the set of his other show, in costume (a surprise to absolutely no one). My main reason for supporting it is that it encourages kids to read. Even back then most of the people my age weren't reading for fun. Despite my love of video games and technology, I think it is important for children to also read books, and get outside and run around/explore/get into trouble. Adults should do those things too, to the best of their abilities (I know, lack of time and eyes or body failing can get in the way).
     
  9. ZXDunny

    ZXDunny Deep avatar

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2010
    Messages:
    2,364
    The Thomas books were first published in 1945! How old are you? :)
     
    rygD likes this.
  10. Linux-SWAT

    Linux-SWAT Advanced Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Messages:
    7,858
    The Necronomicon, written by Abdul al-Hazred.
     
    PCXT, kuru, erico and 2 others like this.
  11. rygD

    rygD Nihilistic Mystic

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Messages:
    6,383
    Location:
    Everywhere
    Not that old. They weren't popular with people I knew, so...no clue.

    That is so not a real name. Still, the book, if pieced together, can be fun. Much better than the book of the same name by "Simon". If I recall correctly, the Donald Tyson one was a fun read, unless I am confusing it with one of the others from that serious (I also recommend his version of Agrippa's Three Books of Occult Philosophy, which I believe was recently published in hardcover). I believe there is a collection of Lovecraft's stories by that name, however I recommend a couple other collections instead. I have seen a few other books by that name, but none really stand out in my mind as being noteworthy.
    Pseudonomicon, by Phil Hine, has some value, as do all of his books I have read, and other books from that group (the Esoteric Order of Dagon). The book(s?) on Yog-Sothothery by Asenath Mason (Necronomicon Gnosis, at least) has some interesting ideas. There is another book I can't recall the name of that I DO NOT recommend, and I believe the author has stuff on the same site as Mason. You are better off taking inspiration from Hine and friends. Or Tyson if you want a lite approach. Then there is the idiot with his Cult of Cthulhu, whose book consists of a printed and bound copy of old Wikipedia stuff. Go for the EOD instead. Actually, I have a bunch of notes on all this and much more if anyone wants me to dig it out.
    --- Double Post Merged, Oct 12, 2017, Original Post Date: Oct 12, 2017 ---
    I forgot about the custom art book Necronomicon you can get made that might be nice if you like the style (check Etsy...I have admitted the artist's work for 13 years or so). And the Giger one.
     
  12. Binky

    Binky Death's Steed Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2003
    Messages:
    6,693
    Location:
    16A (TO)
    Has anyone mentioned Roald Dahl yet?

    Addendum:
    Depending on the target age range, you could do worse than the Discworld books. They're not quite "children's" (except maybe the Tiffany Aching ones) but they're certainly accessible to younger teenagers.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017
    ZXDunny, Eight Bit and rygD like this.
  13. hitbyambulance

    hitbyambulance Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2005
    Messages:
    613
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    the original Winnie-ther-Pooh books - excellent illustrations, satisfying stories, and the narration is quite sarky.
     
    ible and rygD like this.

Share This Page

Loading...