The Internet of Things (Smart locks, etc...)


ible

professional vim user
Joined
Mar 24, 2014
Messages
2,528
Location
Seattle, WA
technically there is an S in the unabbreviated version...
internet of thingS
 

Binky

Death's Steed
Staff member
Joined
May 28, 2003
Messages
6,971
Location
16A (TO)
Oddly, I don't think the biggest problem with smart locks is their disastrously poor information-security design. Working out how to send an unauthenticated "Unlock now" command over Bluetooth is of comparable difficulty to picking or bypassing a cheapish mechanical lock. Not too hard for an engineer, but beyond a common-or-garden burglar.

The problem is the physical design of smart locks. The average thief isn't going to mess around spoofing radio signals when the padlock is shimmable, made of plastic, and held together with hot-snot.

XKCD538 applies.
 

PowerGod

Hardcore Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2011
Messages
3,858
In my palace, we had reinforced doors with multiple physical locks... so they climbed the gutter and broke the window, took all gold (leaving all fakes behind), money, keys, some little digital devices, and then disappeared... all in less than 15 minutes for 4 apartments...
 

ElPoco

Very Active Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
929
Age
36
Location
Paris, France
Working out how to send an unauthenticated "Unlock now" command over Bluetooth is of comparable difficulty to picking or bypassing a cheapish mechanical lock. Not too hard for an engineer, but beyond a common-or-garden burglar.
True but it can be automatized and you can have automatic unlockers sold on the black market so that anyone can unlock the door. This is already the case for car locks.
But it's still cheaper to just break a window or force the door open (unless it's reinforced).

The biggest trouble I see is that with smart lock hacking there's no trace of forced entry. Just a log stating that someone opened the door. Which means that insurance companies can refuse to cover the loss since you have no way to prove that this was a burglary.
 

Binky

Death's Steed
Staff member
Joined
May 28, 2003
Messages
6,971
Location
16A (TO)
I thought insurers generally insist on a certain standard of lock for the property they're insuring. The existing testing agencies and processes would fail most smart locks immediately for mechanical reasons, so the increased risk of traceless entry is a bit of a moot point.

Of course, most masterlock products can be quietly defeated with a rusty paperclip, so the problem isn't unique to electronic wodgits, either.
 

Klumpen

Run away! Run away!
Joined
Nov 19, 2011
Messages
8,570
Location
Uncanny Valley
a6afbf428986526a69e258df73b46d9b.jpg
 

Binky

Death's Steed
Staff member
Joined
May 28, 2003
Messages
6,971
Location
16A (TO)
It might also be that engineers are (by nature or by training) more aware that:
  • A 'dumb' appliance does the job perfectly well, and is only insufficient for a few edge-cases
  • Those 'dumb' appliances will last ten times as long as their 'smart' counterparts.
I have seen porcelain & bakelite light switches still in regular use, several decades after installation - a fair sight better than any of their modern Android-enabled counterparts will manage!
 

Silent-Hunter

Hardcore Member
Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
3,440
I just use OpenHAB and things that work with OpenHAB. That way it's all internal and not online.
 
Top