Talos - IBM power8 based cpu, less blobs?

There it is.

  • Yes

  • No


Results are only viewable after voting.

ible

professional vim user
Joined
Mar 24, 2014
Messages
2,228
Location
Seattle, WA

TrashyMG

Sarcasm Dispenser
Staff member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
10,642
the lowest cost being $1135
About the same price as my Pentium II - 400Mhz processor when it first came out.

Also, funny enough almost every day I walk by the testers at work where they test the functionality of these processors...
 
  • Like
Reactions: rSl

ThinkPad

Very Active Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Messages
434
This is a Workstation, not a regular PC.

The x86 based ones in similar configuration are around the same price

Usually they are used for very heavy computation like video editing, CAD, CAM, rendering, also at some hospitals and research facilities.


You can check Dell Precision and HP Z series for example.

An maxed out, Dual CPU chassis can reach a 50-60000$ or even more... :)
 

TrashyMG

Sarcasm Dispenser
Staff member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
10,642
Linux on a PPC is quite usable, not entirely sure what kind of use-case he has for such a beefy Power 8 system, I could use it at work as a fairly good upgrade to my 11 year old Power 5 AIX system in my office I use for test pattern generation...
 
Last edited:

TrashyMG

Sarcasm Dispenser
Staff member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
10,642
Do they look happy ?
I suppose so? I eat lunch with the one of the programmers/engineers that develops the test programs for the test platform it runs on, he isn't a happy guy, mostly because he's bringing up Power 9 right now.
 

TheOldOne

Fallen Paladin
Joined
Jul 22, 2015
Messages
401
Location
California
Can I integrate QEMU into the firmware and run a x86 OS on it?

Well I couldn't but would it be possible?
 

ThinkPad

Very Active Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Messages
434
Can I integrate QEMU into the firmware and run a x86 OS on it?

Well I couldn't but would it be possible?
Even if its possible, what is the point ?
To run a Windows on PPC?

Why don't you just get a regular x86 Workstation for that.


Debian, RedHat, Trisquel... and so on, are PPC compatible out of the box.
 

pyrat

Very Active Member
Joined
May 20, 2016
Messages
149
Can I integrate QEMU into the firmware and run a x86 OS on it?

Well I couldn't but would it be possible?
I believe the video on the crowdsupply page was done in some virtual machine, possibly QEMU, but Idon't remember well.

Yes, it is expensive, but if at least you can own it, that's at least soem reason to buy something. Buying an X86 computer
that will belong to the builder (and their future owners, governments, whoever breaks into their systems or who knows who)
and by design (for some reason I find it more tolerable when it is by accident, like security bugs) is arguably a worse waste
of money.
 

comradekingu

Glowing ember
Joined
Apr 15, 2011
Messages
4,980
Website
portfolio.anotheragency.no
Posing the question of whether this is within budget for a lot of players who value their privacy, I wonder if they know, or will do anything about it.
If you think 4k dollars is a lot, ask yourself what your government is using on IT that never gets used.
Certainly those numbers are gross for any western government, and reasonably I think this is poses a better alternative to even the stuff most of them do use.
 

ible

professional vim user
Joined
Mar 24, 2014
Messages
2,228
Location
Seattle, WA
I certainly wish the project all the best, and hope that we can start seeing more booting openness soon.

wouldn't mind 256GB of RAM, but probably should find a use for the 32GB I stuck in a small-time server first...
 

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
11,604
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
You could buy a Titanium board based system and run RISC OS on it, if all you care about is binary blobs. I don't know for sure whether that uses no binary blobs, but the main source code is available to view, and it doesn't use the 3D bits of the chip (and the board doesn't have wifi as far as I can tell).

Linux on it might be similarly secure, but I don't know how it boots on that system. RISC OS just has a JMP instruction at address 0 and that's where the system starts from.

But the best way to make a relatively secure system is to take any computer and just never connect it to the internet. So any cheap PC would do the job for that, although I don't know how well Windows 10 functions without an internet connection these days.
 
Top