1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Dismiss Notice

Absurdism corner

Discussion in 'Offtopic Discussions' started by Bosbeetle, Aug 27, 2010.

?

Why?

  1. ¿

    10.0%
  2. Hello World

    16.3%
  3. Non-euclidian geometry

    27.4%
  4. Several at once

    10.0%
  5. Behind a tree in dull lane

    10.0%
  6. Something completely different

    26.3%
  1. Caine

    Caine Hardcore Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    4,029
    Location:
    Netherlands
    I hate translating names too, especially in languages where the spelling is adapted to native pronunciation (some conlangs do this).
    I don't care how you pronounce it dammit, as long as you write it properly.

    Also: who the hell dubs movies?
     
    rygD likes this.
  2. matzesu

    matzesu Advanced Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    2,611
    Location:
    Germany,, Saarland, at home
    Dupped Movies are something diverent, lots of peaple in germany dotnt speak english, so they wouldnd understand what they speaking,
    And some Classics, like the Louis des Funes Movies are Originaly in French, so its good to have them in German..
     
  3. Caine

    Caine Hardcore Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    4,029
    Location:
    Netherlands
    @matzesu We just subtitle everything. That way you retain the voice and performance of the original actors, you can follow the content and you pick up some extra language skills.

    <edit>It is cheaper too</edit>
     
    rygD, Klumpen and Djoga'Ro like this.
  4. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    587
    "Snow" here isn't a name like a family name, but to designate the subject something of a lower standing. They just chose the word for something that's around a lot (maybe there's more to it, I don't see). I think in such a case it's a good idea to translate the "name".
     
    rygD likes this.
  5. matzesu

    matzesu Advanced Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    2,611
    Location:
    Germany,, Saarland, at home
    I wantet to get some french scills by watching a Louis des Funes Movie in French whit german suptitle, but then i noticed the diverents between the text and the speach, and changed the language back to german..
    --- Double Post Merged, Feb 12, 2018, Original Post Date: Feb 12, 2018 ---
    Ah ok, that was something i ditnt know, i tought its a familiy name like "Stark" or "Thyrell" or "Lennister"..

    And therefore, i wants to read the books, to get the knowledge its need to speak about GOT..
     
  6. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    587
    I just realize "lower standing" is a bit too generic. He's a bastard. It's more in the lines of, he doesn't deserve his father's name/he's not to be recognized as being of his actual father, but rather to be of the snow, maybe or something.

    And IIRC, there was another bastard from another - less snowy - region. That one wasn't called snow, which seems to be the standard in the north, but something else, which in turn seems to be the standard in that other region. Forgot, who it was or what that other name was, though.
     
  7. Failbert

    Failbert Still Fresh

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2017
    Messages:
    43
    We just have one actor read all the lines of all the characters, male, female, young and old, in a voice over. Dubbing is used for animated movies and as for live acting mostly in family/children's flicks. Some TVs ca. late90's-early 00's tried dubbing with different actors, or just subtitling movies, but seems that it didn't catch on.

    If anyone is interested in how it sounds, below is a link (Link 1) to a scene from The Mask, first with the voice over and then a dub. Skim through it and You can imagine the difference in conveying emotions vs. "serving" dialogue (for most adult Polish people dubs are an uncanny valley type of thing). Link 2 is a comparison of various single-voiceovers for Predator, most of them hastily recorded by professional actors and voice actors in shady "studios" which would legally (legit distribution), semi-legally (gray area, loose agreements, sourcing movies through weird channels), or downright illegally (recording new audio over a home video source) translate and voice VHS tapes which would take the country by storm, in the early 90's when the communist government censorship of movies would be lifted and rapid installation of "more" free market would mean that people can become enterpreneurs more easily, own and trade foreign currencies like dollars, import hella stuff from around the world. Good times filled with catching up on the movies both by TV stations and home video means.

    Link1:
    Link2:

    Extra fun fact: one of those voice over guys who voiced most Stallone and other action flicks was hired by fans to record such a voice over for Kung Fury.
     
    FBnil and Djoga'Ro like this.
  8. Caine

    Caine Hardcore Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    4,029
    Location:
    Netherlands
    I have seen that on television when I was in Poland about two decades ago. Terrible. Worst thing ever.
     
    Djoga'Ro likes this.
  9. rygD

    rygD Nihilistic Mystic

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Messages:
    7,198
    Location:
    Everywhere
    Having not read the books, as I understand it from the TV series it is one of the names used for bastards (in the North, but south of the wall, such as around Winterfell). I think the commonness is a part of the point. Since it is the nobility that would be most concerned with such things it almost seems to have the opposite effect of what seems intended (unimportant person has the bastard name, so obviously important to someone).

    I am probably wrong about all of that.

    Doh! I see you already covered this. Oh well.
    Wasn't it the blacksmith kid that is, from some views, the most recent rightful heir to the throne (because Cersei's children don't count, for obvious reasons). He was somebody's bastard, and I think it was King's Landing. I don't really remember either.
     
  10. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    587
    @rygD I haven't read the books either. If it wasn't common knowledge in the north (at Winterfell and among the other leaders), who fathered John-Boy, I didn't get that.

    I wouldn't think, it was the blacksmith. His lineage was that kind of Top Secret, they would have avoided such a giveaway.
    I have a vague notion it was someone from down south and the substitute surname was Sand. Very vague notion. Damn, I'm in dire need of memory upgrade. I wonder, if the DragonBox has something in store.
     
  11. rygD

    rygD Nihilistic Mystic

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Messages:
    7,198
    Location:
    Everywhere
    I'm pretty sure at least amongst the upper class it was known who fathered Jon Snow. That was my point. The surname doesn't hide his lineage, as it only draws attention to the fact that he is the bastard of someone important, so if you didn't know, now you do.

    Probably the visitors from Dorne. For reference: http://gameofthrones.wikia.com/wiki/Bastardy
    --- Double Post Merged, Feb 13, 2018, Original Post Date: Feb 13, 2018 ---
     
    Djoga'Ro likes this.
  12. FBnil

    FBnil What is laugh? Baby don't hurt me....

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Messages:
    2,304
    Location:
    Yurp
    Spanish does this. "Cristobal Colón" for Cristoforo Colombo (you might know him as Columbus. the latinized version).
    The Netherlands does this "Orange" (pronounce like a French, ouh-rahn-sh) became "Oranje" (pronounce like a Dutch, ouh-ran-djeh). Before that word, the Dutch used geel-rood (yellow-red). And exports "apartheid".
    In Peru, the Chinese restaurants are called "shifas" (she-fahs), from Chinese, "fried rice", chǎofàn).
    From Nahuatl, you have Chocolatl (chocolate), Chili (chili) and ahuacatl (avocado) amongst others.

    But what I absolutely hate from Spanish is the fact that Soya is not translated to Soja, and thus pronounced in a horrible way (scraping your throat), instead of how it should be pronounced (like boo-ya).
     
  13. rygD

    rygD Nihilistic Mystic

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Messages:
    7,198
    Location:
    Everywhere
    [​IMG]
     
    FBnil likes this.
  14. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    587
    Ever seen a movie or tv-show in English, where they have some scholar reading/speaking Latin. Often times they pronounce the written word as if it were English with its deranged/shifted vowels. That's ear wrekking. I can understand it, when the portraited character is a highscholl student, who doesn't know better, but one meant to know Latin by profession... nope.
     
  15. levi

    levi Still fresh, damnit!

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    9,340
    Location:
    Somewhere off the coast of the EU
    When I did latin at school, my teacher told me that nobody knew how it sounded so you may as well say it as english vowels and that. I don't think that was strictly true even back then fwiw.
     
    rygD likes this.
  16. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    587
    It seems the vowel shifts in English over the time are very well understood and English trailed off some in that regard. It probably would have been better advise had he said, pronounce the vowels anyhow but the way you know from English ;P

    And, one should think there is enough written material from different times, cultures and in different languages for very good comparative analysis to be done by very studious, micrological linguist, we have no shortage of, to draw a pretty good picture - at least with the help IT has to offer nowadays.

    There are productions, that take this aspect serious, and it shows. If you don't want to consult an expert, you can still apply Spanish pronounciation and are far closer.
    (... if it ain't it directly? I'm especially unsure about diphtongs.)
     
    FBnil likes this.
  17. levi

    levi Still fresh, damnit!

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    9,340
    Location:
    Somewhere off the coast of the EU
    Yes, in English the vowel shifts are still in evidence. If, as a northerner you'd say 'pub', say 'pab' and you sound like a southerner saying the same word, and 'pib' to sound like a royal. English adopted most of its latinate words via French in C14 or so IIRC, and I think the vowels were already mobile by then.
     
    Djoga'Ro likes this.
  18. Binky

    Binky Death's Steed Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2003
    Messages:
    6,794
    Location:
    16A (TO)
    Some Noarferners also use the second-person (edit) singular, which is entirely missing from Suven English.

    "Thaa's ah daft eh-pth" is "You (singular) are a foolish half-penny's worth" (i.e. a useless person, but meant in a friendly way)

    Then there's my favourite road sign...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2018
    _jr_, Djoga'Ro, levi and 1 other person like this.
  19. rygD

    rygD Nihilistic Mystic

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Messages:
    7,198
    Location:
    Everywhere
    That's why we call them bars. Damn Brits. :p
     
    JDTAY, Djoga'Ro and levi like this.
  20. FBnil

    FBnil What is laugh? Baby don't hurt me....

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Messages:
    2,304
    Location:
    Yurp
    Yeah, I can relate. As for the Spanish pronunciation, closer but still not accentless as the sing-song-ness of Latin is different (closer to Italian) and some vowel pronunciations are just "unique". Also Hispanofonics try to add the Spanish stress and forget to pronounce the H (which is mute in Spanish in most cases), while the Latin rules are different. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_spelling_and_pronunciation.
     
    Djoga'Ro likes this.

Share This Page

Loading...