What we learned and did during the last 6 months


EvilDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 4, 2003
Messages
29,796
Age
43
Location
Ingolstadt
Quite a few members have asked for a newspost with up-to-date information about the assembly, speed improvements as well as estimations how things will continue.

This will probably be a longer post, so grab some tea or coffee and enjoy the read.


Why has assembly been so slow until now?

There various reasons why assembly has been so slow.


Too much work and too little time

One of them was that I had very little time: Due to Covid-19, my main employee who handles all the shipments in the shop was not in the office for more than two months. During that time, I had to handle all shipments myself - and so time was very limited.
During the little time I had left, I preassembled units and had to figure out what issues there are and how to prevent / improve them.
More on that later :)

That reason has been resolved now, luckily. My employee is back shipping, I was able to catch up with all tickets in the shop and my wife (who recently lost her job) is now preassembling units, which makes assembly a lot faster than before.
Last week I assembled 12 units within 2 hours each day, which is why we suddenly jumped up by 50 in numbers. I plan to continue that speed soon, but I needed to do something else first (test all boards I have, more information about that further down).

So the next 100 - 150 units should be finished soon - after that we'll most likely have a short break as we need more cases first. But more on that further down as well.


Figuring out all issues, finding workarounds, discussing possible fixes with the case company

This is probably the main reason why things have been so slow at the beginning. With each batch of units, we improved the assembly process, found new issues or better workarounds.
We read the posts by users who received their units and continued improving with each batch.

I can't remember when we fixed exactly what, but all in all, we probably needed around 1 hour of work time for each unit to make it work properly! Some worked right away, but some had to be disassembled and reassembled partly or fully multiple times until they were good enough to be shipped.
Now we're probably down to about 15 minutes per unit, which is a bit longer than it took for the Pandora after the process had been optimized, but as we still have some manual fixes to apply, that's pretty good.

In case you want to know what fixes we currently need to do (and whether these can be fixed in the future) read the spoiler :)

Fixes we need to apply to the case parts

Removing small pegs from the inner display frame

IMG_20210604_185959.jpg

The previous designers added these pegs (I didn't even know about that), probably because they thought these will keep the LCD properly in place and otherwise it would move around (which it wouldn't - the Pandora also doesn't have the issue).
I've marked two of them in the picture above.

Unfortunately, these pegs cause an issue during assembly: As the frame is put on top of the LCD, these small pegs can easily CRACK the touchscreen as force is applied at that one point... even though the surroundings would fit.
To prevent that from happening, we need to manually cut all these pegs out with a knife, which takes about 45 seconds for each frame.

Fortunately, that was an easy fix in the mould, so the next batch of cases won't have these annoying little pegs anymore!


Cutting plastic from the battery compartment

If you received one of the first units, you probably have the issue that the battery compartment is very hard to open. We tried to fix the battery cover at first, but it turns out there's a way better fix for that. Cutting a bit of plastic from the battery compartment!

IMG_20210604_190923.jpg
Originally, the plastic goes about as far as the red line - which leads to the issue that the clips are WAY too tight.
Removing a bit of plastic there makes the battery cover way more easy to open and close. However, removing too much will case the battery cover to not close properly anymore, so we need to cut, test, cut more, test again, and so on.
This needs about 1,5 minutes.

Luckily, that's also fixed in the moulds, so the next cases won't need that fix anymore!


Loosening the lower shoulder buttons a bit

The hole where the shoulder buttons are being put onto the peg is a bit too tight (interestingly enough, it was the same with the Pandora).
The difference is that the Pyra doesn't have full rings that go onto the peg but only half rings which you can easily bend open.
That's not a big thing and only takes about 10 seconds for both shoulder buttons - and that's also fixed in the mould, so a non-issue in the future.


Removing a bit of plastic below the DPad

Unfortunately, the hole for the DPad was off a bit - causing the DPad to collide a bit with the case when you push down.

IMG_20210604_194947.jpg
This doesn't take long (around 10 seconds per case part), but it's been fixed in the mould nevertheless, so also a non-issue in the future.


Cutting a bit from the keymat

We already knew about this before we produced the keymats, but the company didn't want to change the mould as it could cause some damage in that area - but I thought I mention that nevertheless:

IMG_20210604_195539.jpg
The keymat would collide with the case surrounding the speaker, causing DPad Up to feel stiffer than the other directions. It takes about 2 - 3 seconds to cut it, so I was fine doing that :)


Cutting away plastic leftovers from the production

There are various areas where there are plastic leftovers which we need to cut with a knife. This can probably be improved in the future by tweaking some machine data (heating, cooling, injection speed, etc.)
All in all, this takes around 30 - 45 seconds per case, just a guess.

Workarounds because we're missing a part of the mould


This is a pretty annoying issue. FormAction has created a special injection part for one mould to make the plastic between the battery and the PCB thinner. I even had to pay extra for that.
It seems they have NOT delivered that part to us, and we're currently trying to get that part! We've paid for it, it is ours, so they can't simply refuse to give it to us.

It's pretty obvious that such a part exists, if you compare earlier cases from FormAction and the newer ones:

188752593_3027150080853696_3423193522937187063_n.jpg
You don't need to be a genius to see that the surface is completely different! So yeah, something is clearly missing here.
Unfortunately, we cannot simply recreate that part and make the case thinner as well, as we're missing the 3D data of the case.
So there only two options: Either restart the full case of the Pyra from scratch - or get that part.
The thicker plastic causes the following issues:
  • Battery compartment does not close fully and has gaps at the side
  • Nubs are being pushed against the case and get stuck
  • No air gap between the CPU board and the battery compartment, causing the battery to heat up more than it needs to be
  • Causing the battery to have worse contact
  • It also causes the keyboard and gaming buttons to be a bit more mushy than they should be. It's nothing serious, but they could still be a bit better :)
Here are the workarounds we're doing at the moment:

Sanding down the pegs in the battery cover

So, to fix the gap, we're sanding down the peg in the battery compartment:

IMG_20210604_193715.jpg
Originally, they had been added to push the battery down - but with the thicker plastic, that's too much. At the same time, we're pulling out the battery contacts a bit so they don't lose the contact that easily. Takes about 15 seconds per battery cover.
This fix has also been applied to the mould, so it's not needed in the future.

In case we get that part and are able to make the plastic thinner again, I'll use foam pads there instead of the plastic pegs. That's more flexible and does a better job.


Sanding down the area around the nubs

That's actually pretty annoying. To prevent the nubs getting stuck, we need to make the plastic area around the nubs thinner. That's a bit of manual work and takes about a minute per case:

IMG_20210604_194250.jpg
This is something we cannot change in the current moulds (removing plastic means adding steel in a mould...)
So this is something we'll always need to do unless we can get that missing part from the mould!

Adding small selfadhesive rubber pads at the edges of the CPU board

By doing this, we can recreate a small gap of air between the CPU board and the battery, causing the battery to stay a lot cooler!
This works without any bigger issue, as we sand down enough plastic for the moulds already.

So, most of these issues will be fixed with the next case production run.

Right now, we're applying these fixes manually before assembly, which works very well and doesn't slow us down that much.
However, it caused quite a delay at the beginning... as we were assembling units, finding issues, had to disassemble them again, tried to find fixes, etc.
This was a pretty slow process. Now that we know what we need to do, it's a lot faster and pretty straightforward.

These fixes have already applied to most of the cases we still have here. However, as the coating company had issues at first as well (too much or little paint causing not-so-pretty looking cases), we only have around 350 cases in total we can assemble at the moment.
The next ones need to be produced first (which takes about a week), then transported to us (which takes about 2 - 3 weeks) and then they need to be coated (could be 1 week or longer, depending on how much work the company has at the moment).

So there could be a small gap after the first around 350 units have been assembled, but it shouldn't be too long.

What about the PCBs?

The first batch of PCBs we received was pretty good. We had a failure rate of about 5%, which is okay for a new production run.
However, we assembled these units first and then had to disassemble them again if a PCB failed, which needed a bit more time that it should.
So now I'm doing a quick test before we assemble them so we know they do boot at least.

This was especially necessary as we received a bad batch of mainboards! Out of 100 delivered, 44 didn't even react to power!
That's something that needs to be resolved! It's probably something simple, as there are not a lot of parts between the USB port and the charger chip. And as so many units are affected, it could be a bad batch of one part which would then need to be replaced on the boards.
However, it meant that I had to do a quick test with all mainboards I had here so I can send them to Nikolaus / Global Components for debugging right away.

That's the reason I didn't assemble and ship more Pyras during the last few days (whereas I was shipping 12 per day the days before).
Now that all boards have been tested, I can continue with the assembly and shipping of units.

Oh, speaking of PCBs, there's also a bit of manual work I need to do on the current PCBs (fixed with the next production run):

Remove a resistor from the CPU-Board

That resistor was a leftover when we planned to use the same BurrBrown ADC for audio which we used for the Pandora:

IMG_20210604_201440.jpg
Unfortunately, there's is no way to connect the ADC to the OMAP5, so using that audio circuit was not possible. But there still was a resistor left - which caused the audio stream to react to noise in the unit. For example, starting the vibration always destroyed the audio stream. Removing that resistor fixes that, and at the moment, I need to do that manually.

Remove a resistor from the Mainboard

This is actually a small fix that was found by a community member: The emergency-shutoff temperature for the battery is configured using two resistor values. And it was set a bit too low, causing the battery to stop charging when the unit was being used AND the CPU-Board was still touching the battery case.

IMG_20210604_201511.jpg

Removing the resistor changes the temperature value. Based on Nikolaus calculations, the emergency shutoff temperature is still low enough to not damage the battery, but now you can use the Pyra and charge at the same time - especially with the air gap between the CPU board and the battery.
The downside is that it now also has an emergency shutdown if the battery temperature is lower than about 10 - 12 °C. However, charging and using the CPU heats up the case anyways, so it should still charge with a lower outside temperature. So as long as you don't try to charge the Pyra in the fridge, everything is fine.
In the next production run, a different resistor value will be used which make it possible to charge at lower temperatures again as well. But at the moment, this is a pretty good workaround.


Future production run?

We have parts for around 520 units, which means that depending on the failure rate, we can assemble around 500 units before the next production run.
As you know, there's a global parts shortage right now - and we don't know what this will mean for the Pyras production, but that's the next thing I need to find out.

The OMAP5 probably won't be an issue, as it's not a mainstream part. For other parts, we can probably get replacements if need be.
I know the production will be at least 4.5% more expensive, which will cause me a bit more loss, but I still won't change the price you preordered it for, so don't worry about that.

There might be one change in the future: The manufacturer of our modem has released a pin-compatible version that works in any region. So no US / EU anymore! I'm currently testing it on a modified PCB to see how well it works, but it could be that the next production run will use that new modem. We'll see, nothing can be said for sure now.

I might also build a new case from scratch... but that's also in the future and we'll continue assembling Pyras while working on that, no worries :)

But you can be sure we'll continue improving the Pyra, so hopefully, it will be as good as I imagined it should be at some time :)

That was quite a lenghty post (took a few hours to write it up as well), but I hope you enjoyed it and now have a better insight of what happened.

As usual, in case you have any questions: Let me know!
 

Phlyra

Electric
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Messages
1,162
Quite a few members have asked for a newspost with up-to-date information about the assembly, speed improvements as well as estimations how things will continue.

This will probably be a longer post, so grab some tea or coffee and enjoy the read.


Why has assembly been so slow until now?

There various reasons why assembly has been so slow.


Too much work and too little time

One of them was that I had very little time: Due to Covid-19, my main employee who handles all the shipments in the shop was not in the office for more than two months. During that time, I had to handle all shipments myself - and so time was very limited.
During the little time I had left, I preassembled units and had to figure out what issues there are and how to prevent / improve them.
More on that later :)

That reason has been resolved now, luckily. My employee is back shipping, I was able to catch up with all tickets in the shop and my wife (who recently lost her job) is now preassembling units, which makes assembly a lot faster than before.
Last week I assembled 12 units within 2 hours each day, which is why we suddenly jumped up by 50 in numbers. I plan to continue that speed soon, but I needed to do something else first (test all boards I have, more information about that further down).

So the next 100 - 150 units should be finished soon - after that we'll most likely have a short break as we need more cases first. But more on that further down as well.


Figuring out all issues, finding workarounds, discussing possible fixes with the case company

This is probably the main reason why things have been so slow at the beginning. With each batch of units, we improved the assembly process, found new issues or better workarounds.
We read the posts by users who received their units and continued improving with each batch.

I can't remember when we fixed exactly what, but all in all, we probably needed around 1 hour of work time for each unit to make it work properly! Some worked right away, but some had to be disassembled and reassembled partly or fully multiple times until they were good enough to be shipped.
Now we're probably down to about 15 minutes per unit, which is a bit longer than it took for the Pandora after the process had been optimized, but as we still have some manual fixes to apply, that's pretty good.

In case you want to know what fixes we currently need to do (and whether these can be fixed in the future) read the spoiler :)

Fixes we need to apply to the case parts

Removing small pegs from the inner display frame

View attachment 37224

The previous designers added these pegs (I didn't even know about that), probably because they thought these will keep the LCD properly in place and otherwise it would move around (which it wouldn't - the Pandora also doesn't have the issue).
I've marked two of them in the picture above.

Unfortunately, these pegs cause an issue during assembly: As the frame is put on top of the LCD, these small pegs can easily CRACK the touchscreen as force is applied at that one point... even though the surroundings would fit.
To prevent that from happening, we need to manually cut all these pegs out with a knife, which takes about 45 seconds for each frame.

Fortunately, that was an easy fix in the mould, so the next batch of cases won't have these annoying little pegs anymore!


Cutting plastic from the battery compartment

If you received one of the first units, you probably have the issue that the battery compartment is very hard to open. We tried to fix the battery cover at first, but it turns out there's a way better fix for that. Cutting a bit of plastic from the battery compartment!

View attachment 37225
Originally, the plastic goes about as far as the red line - which leads to the issue that the clips are WAY too tight.
Removing a bit of plastic there makes the battery cover way more easy to open and close. However, removing too much will case the battery cover to not close properly anymore, so we need to cut, test, cut more, test again, and so on.
This needs about 1,5 minutes.

Luckily, that's also fixed in the moulds, so the next cases won't need that fix anymore!


Loosening the lower shoulder buttons a bit

The hole where the shoulder buttons are being put onto the peg is a bit too tight (interestingly enough, it was the same with the Pandora).
The difference is that the Pyra doesn't have full rings that go onto the peg but only half rings which you can easily bend open.
That's not a big thing and only takes about 10 seconds for both shoulder buttons - and that's also fixed in the mould, so a non-issue in the future.


Removing a bit of plastic below the DPad

Unfortunately, the hole for the DPad was off a bit - causing the DPad to collide a bit with the case when you push down.

View attachment 37229
This doesn't take long (around 10 seconds per case part), but it's been fixed in the mould nevertheless, so also a non-issue in the future.


Cutting a bit from the keymat

We already knew about this before we produced the keymats, but the company didn't want to change the mould as it could cause some damage in that area - but I thought I mention that nevertheless:

View attachment 37230
The keymat would collide with the case surrounding the speaker, causing DPad Up to feel stiffer than the other directions. It takes about 2 - 3 seconds to cut it, so I was fine doing that :)


Cutting away plastic leftovers from the production

There are various areas where there are plastic leftovers which we need to cut with a knife. This can probably be improved in the future by tweaking some machine data (heating, cooling, injection speed, etc.)
All in all, this takes around 30 - 45 seconds per case, just a guess.

Workarounds because we're missing a part of the mould


This is a pretty annoying issue. FormAction has created a special injection part for one mould to make the plastic between the battery and the PCB thinner. I even had to pay extra for that.
It seems they have NOT delivered that part to us, and we're currently trying to get that part! We've paid for it, it is ours, so they can't simply refuse to give it to us.

It's pretty obvious that such a part exists, if you compare earlier cases from FormAction and the newer ones:

View attachment 37226
You don't need to be a genius to see that the surface is completely different! So yeah, something is clearly missing here.
Unfortunately, we cannot simply recreate that part and make the case thinner as well, as we're missing the 3D data of the case.
So there only two options: Either restart the full case of the Pyra from scratch - or get that part.
The thicker plastic causes the following issues:
  • Battery compartment does not close fully and has gaps at the side
  • Nubs are being pushed against the case and get stuck
  • No air gap between the CPU board and the battery compartment, causing the battery to heat up more than it needs to be
  • Causing the battery to have worse contact
  • It also causes the keyboard and gaming buttons to be a bit more mushy than they should be. It's nothing serious, but they could still be a bit better :)
Here are the workarounds we're doing at the moment:

Sanding down the pegs in the battery cover

So, to fix the gap, we're sanding down the peg in the battery compartment:

View attachment 37227
Originally, they had been added to push the battery down - but with the thicker plastic, that's too much. At the same time, we're pulling out the battery contacts a bit so they don't lose the contact that easily. Takes about 15 seconds per battery cover.
This fix has also been applied to the mould, so it's not needed in the future.

In case we get that part and are able to make the plastic thinner again, I'll use foam pads there instead of the plastic pegs. That's more flexible and does a better job.


Sanding down the area around the nubs

That's actually pretty annoying. To prevent the nubs getting stuck, we need to make the plastic area around the nubs thinner. That's a bit of manual work and takes about a minute per case:

View attachment 37228
This is something we cannot change in the current moulds (removing plastic means adding steel in a mould...)
So this is something we'll always need to do unless we can get that missing part from the mould!

Adding small selfadhesive rubber pads at the edges of the CPU board

By doing this, we can recreate a small gap of air between the CPU board and the battery, causing the battery to stay a lot cooler!
This works without any bigger issue, as we sand down enough plastic for the moulds already.

So, most of these issues will be fixed with the next case production run.

Right now, we're applying these fixes manually before assembly, which works very well and doesn't slow us down that much.
However, it caused quite a delay at the beginning... as we were assembling units, finding issues, had to disassemble them again, tried to find fixes, etc.
This was a pretty slow process. Now that we know what we need to do, it's a lot faster and pretty straightforward.

These fixes have already applied to most of the cases we still have here. However, as the coating company had issues at first as well (too much or little paint causing not-so-pretty looking cases), we only have around 350 cases in total we can assemble at the moment.
The next ones need to be produced first (which takes about a week), then transported to us (which takes about 2 - 3 weeks) and then they need to be coated (could be 1 week or longer, depending on how much work the company has at the moment).

So there could be a small gap after the first around 350 units have been assembled, but it shouldn't be too long.

What about the PCBs?

The first batch of PCBs we received was pretty good. We had a failure rate of about 5%, which is okay for a new production run.
However, we assembled these units first and then had to disassemble them again if a PCB failed, which needed a bit more time that it should.
So now I'm doing a quick test before we assemble them so we know they do boot at least.

This was especially necessary as we received a bad batch of mainboards! Out of 100 delivered, 44 didn't even react to power!
That's something that needs to be resolved! It's probably something simple, as there are not a lot of parts between the USB port and the charger chip. And as so many units are affected, it could be a bad batch of one part which would then need to be replaced on the boards.
However, it meant that I had to do a quick test with all mainboards I had here so I can send them to Nikolaus / Global Components for debugging right away.

That's the reason I didn't assemble and ship more Pyras during the last few days (whereas I was shipping 12 per day the days before).
Now that all boards have been tested, I can continue with the assembly and shipping of units.

Oh, speaking of PCBs, there's also a bit of manual work I need to do on the current PCBs (fixed with the next production run):

Remove a resistor from the CPU-Board

That resistor was a leftover when we planned to use the same BurrBrown ADC for audio which we used for the Pandora:

View attachment 37232
Unfortunately, there's is no way to connect the ADC to the OMAP5, so using that audio circuit was not possible. But there still was a resistor left - which caused the audio stream to react to noise in the unit. For example, starting the vibration always destroyed the audio stream. Removing that resistor fixes that, and at the moment, I need to do that manually.

Remove a resistor from the Mainboard

This is actually a small fix that was found by a community member: The emergency-shutoff temperature for the battery is configured using two resistor values. And it was set a bit too low, causing the battery to stop charging when the unit was being used AND the CPU-Board was still touching the battery case.

View attachment 37231

Removing the resistor changes the temperature value. Based on Nikolaus calculations, the emergency shutoff temperature is still low enough to not damage the battery, but now you can use the Pyra and charge at the same time - especially with the air gap between the CPU board and the battery.
The downside is that it now also has an emergency shutdown if the battery temperature is lower than about 10 - 12 °C. However, charging and using the CPU heats up the case anyways, so it should still charge with a lower outside temperature. So as long as you don't try to charge the Pyra in the fridge, everything is fine.
In the next production run, a different resistor value will be used which make it possible to charge at lower temperatures again as well. But at the moment, this is a pretty good workaround.


Future production run?

We have parts for around 520 units, which means that depending on the failure rate, we can assemble around 500 units before the next production run.
As you know, there's a global parts shortage right now - and we don't know what this will mean for the Pyras production, but that's the next thing I need to find out.

The OMAP5 probably won't be an issue, as it's not a mainstream part. For other parts, we can probably get replacements if need be.
I know the production will be at least 4.5% more expensive, which will cause me a bit more loss, but I still won't change the price you preordered it for, so don't worry about that.

There might be one change in the future: The manufacturer of our modem has released a pin-compatible version that works in any region. So no US / EU anymore! I'm currently testing it on a modified PCB to see how well it works, but it could be that the next production run will use that new modem. We'll see, nothing can be said for sure now.

I might also build a new case from scratch... but that's also in the future and we'll continue assembling Pyras while working on that, no worries :)

But you can be sure we'll continue improving the Pyra, so hopefully, it will be as good as I imagined it should be at some time :)

That was quite a lenghty post (took a few hours to write it up as well), but I hope you enjoyed it and now have a better insight of what happened.

As usual, in case you have any questions: Let me know!
Thank you very much for all that. Of course, we appreciate that the time it takes you to explain all this is time you necessarily can’t spend on repairing units etc. but it is a much appreciated update that helps keep us in the loop! Always educational to better understand what you’re impressively managing as an almost one-man-band
 

Djoga'Ro

moonstruck
Joined
Apr 3, 2016
Messages
2,096
Thanks for the update, very much appreciated.
I might also build a new case from scratch... but that's also in the future and we'll continue assembling Pyras while working on that, no worries :)
My boss asked me to let you know, that we've got an HP Jet Fusion 5200. So if you should need some prototype or something that cannot be injection-moulded printed, let me know.
 

Inqui

Very Active Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2014
Messages
234
Location
NRW
Nice to hear some process.

Do you recommend to let us remove those resistors ourself ? Maybe a quick video how to locate those guys and what to take care about.

Those additional casefixes, I would apply them with this description you made.

Always improvement ahead :)

Gesendet von meinem Pixel 4a mit Tapatalk
 

TeDaDeS

Advanced Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,232
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
Thanks for the in-depth report ED, it's appreciated ;)

ED: This years GamesCom will again be digital-only. Do you already know if you have some space somewhere to display your shop / Pyra?
 

Silent-Hunter

Hardcore Member
Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
3,476
I do believe my modem may be broken, would I be able to get a new mainboard with this new modem on it when they're ready? I still want to try to use the Pyra as a phone.

In the mean time, I've ordered a PinePhone, but seeing some of the issues and QA problems people have had, I'm thinking of canceling my order.
 

ArchiMark

Digerati & Pretty Nice Guy
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
298
Location
USA
Thank you for the comprehensive update, ED!

Clearly a lot involved to get the units assembled correctly.

For various reasons, I did not pre-pre or pre-order.

If I were to order now, would I receive a Pyra in 2021 or 2022 or ?

Best wishes on your work and Pyras.

Mark
 

EvilDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 4, 2003
Messages
29,796
Age
43
Location
Ingolstadt
ED: This years GamesCom will again be digital-only. Do you already know if you have some space somewhere to display your shop / Pyra?

I'm actually pretty much involved in the full livestream, but mostly taking care of some technical stuff.
There is more planned than streams though and I will probably have a virtual booth though.

I do believe my modem may be broken, would I be able to get a new mainboard with this new modem on it when they're ready? I still want to try to use the Pyra as a phone.

Not sure it's broken, as I'm not sure many are actively using it. Also, we still have an USB Issue in our setup (in the support section is someone who has an issue with both USB Ports) and the modem is also connected via USB.
So there seems to be something wrong in our USB setup. AFAIK, it works with LetuxOS and I know it can heavily change based on the U-Boot version we use (and we use a different one than Letux).

So that's probably more a software issue.
 

Silent-Hunter

Hardcore Member
Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
3,476
Maybe, except booting a fresh image doesn't help, and the other USB ports still work. In any case I'd like to be able to buy one of the new mainboards, as I assume the new modem will support VoLTE, right?
 

EvilDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 4, 2003
Messages
29,796
Age
43
Location
Ingolstadt
Maybe, except booting a fresh image doesn't help, and the other USB ports still work. In any case I'd like to be able to buy one of the new mainboards, as I assume the new modem will support VoLTE, right?
If the image uses the buggy U-boot, then the ports won't work. When I tried it not even a mouse did work (was using too much power according to the dmesg log)
The other USB ports might use a different host, as they worked for me as well. Only the big ones and the modem didn't work.

I haven't checked the features for the new modem yet.
 

Eight Bit

Hardcore Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Messages
1,941
Age
47
Location
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Website
Visit site
@EvilDragon Are you building the units per type? I paid for mine directly after receiving your mail almost 2 weeks ago but I haven't received a transport notification yet.. I did notice people with higher order numbers already receiving theirs...

I'm still sitting on my hands.. :)
 

EvilDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 4, 2003
Messages
29,796
Age
43
Location
Ingolstadt
Yes. We first built the US and standard dark chrome units, now we're building dark chrome EU units as well as all black variants.

Everything else would just be more complex and slow things down :)
 

fusion_power

Advanced Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2005
Messages
13,171
Location
germany
Website
Visit site
That's a lot of fixing things, wow. I'm somehow shocked that after so many years where the Pyra case was tweaked there are still so many "bugs" in it. Whoever designed that thing in the first place did a terrible job imho. Especially when I look at all these handhelds that came out during the Pyra development. Usually, the casing there seems to be OK most of the time and also look nice, unlike the weird Pyra case. I hope that if there will ever be a new case for the Pyra, the designer is a pro and can benefit from all the experience ED had during the development. And we know that#s actually alot of experience. ^^
 

EvilDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 4, 2003
Messages
29,796
Age
43
Location
Ingolstadt
That's a lot of fixing things, wow. I'm somehow shocked that after so many years where the Pyra case was tweaked there are still so many "bugs" in it. Whoever designed that thing in the first place did a terrible job imho.

Unfortunately, we know this for quite a while now. They also never ever did what I suggested how it should be done but made it how THEY think it should be. Which lead to everything being too tight and a lot of other issues.
 

matzesu

Forum Addict!
Staff member
Joined
Oct 24, 2008
Messages
11,552
Age
37
Location
Germany,, Saarland, at home
Im fine whit my Pyra Case, it’s quite thought,
Although next bike ride I will put the Pyra out of my pocket..

It’s quite amazing how much Pyra you got out even whit the issue you have to fix..

Thanks for the update..

Can whe have a new warning text in the manual: not for pocket carry on the e-bike .. ^^
 
Top